The Way to Cook: How to BBQ

HamBonesCookingTechniques

The Way to Cook: How to BBQ

It’s getting along near that time – weather warming up; days are longer; lakes, rivers, beaches (and heated swimming pools!!!) are becoming more and more inviting! Hoorah!!! It’s almost bar-be-que season!

Now ladies, please don’t you get flustered; don’t you get insulted! But, pretty much, unless you are the Grill Queen in your house – this one time – this post is really meant for the fellas who always stick their chest out after cooking on the grill! Will you be sweet enough to print this and pass it along to them for me please?!!!!! But again, if it is YOU who master the grill at your house, then by all means, this blog post is for you!!!

Come Memorial Day; come Fourth of July; come Labor Day; come Football Tailgating Season – every guy thinks he’s a Grill Master; King of the Pit; the Don of the BBQ grill! It’s the time to brag and show off your outdoor cooking skills.

Now, we’re not talking about grilled salmon and other fancy grilled fish; stuffed jalapeno peppers; filet mignon; lamb chops and all the fare of culinary decadence that say we have arrived!!! No, no – I’m talking about good ol’ down-home true southern bar-be-queuing – and it is not an ostentatious event! Rather the opposite, it’s a social gathering in a most fundamental sense where the most polished of social graces are rather relaxed!!! So, these are the preliminary steps to get ready to bar-be-que:

1. Pull out your folding lawn chairs and put ‘em under a shade tree

2. Bring out your 50-gallon cooler with a couple dozen cans of beer sitting in some half-way melted crushed ice

3. Have your grill fired up burning the splint wood, shredded newspaper, and a couple split logs of wood, (I use pecan wood and peach wood), so that the coals are ready

4. Get your food-quality plastic spray bottle and fill it half with water, and half with apple juice infused with cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and cloves (i.e., don’t frown, work with me here boys, you gonna love the results)

5. Get your second food-quality plastic spray bottle and fill it with JUST WATER

6. Dependent upon the size of your grill, you will need one or two disposable aluminum rectangular pans (they will be filled with water and spices later. The spices you use will be two tablespoons of your dry rub!)

7. Now, sit yourself down and let’s chat about some ribs, chicken, and steaks! Burgers and franks are the preliminary appetizer meats–no need for discussion here!

Of course, I’m going to go out on a limb here and make a courageous and complimentary assumption that all of us sitting under this here tree have seen many a hot grills and cooked many a slabs of ribs! So, I will further assume that a couple days ago you took the time to trim ya’ ribs (but, don’t take off the silver on the bottom side it holds in the juices and flavor of the bone–[the diner takes that off when served]; and don’t take off that glorious fat)! By trimming, I mean using your filet knife and barely remove any hanging pieces of fat and/or tendon. If you don’t see any, all the better – “ . . . you don’t have no trimming to do”!!!

Okay boys, (and girls who are Grill Queens), let’s make sure we understand each other! I’m a sho-nuff born and bred South Carolina boy who will not, under any circumstances, hack up a beautiful slab of ribs trying to make them even and fancy and picture-book pretty, givin’ ’em the fancy name of a patron saint, all the while shorting my guests of some of the rib meat! No, no – not at my house! When I tell you to come on over for some ribs, you gonna get the whole SPARE rib! Ain’t gonna be no cutting off at the joint and calling those rib ends! I just ain’t gonna do ya’ like that! You gonna sit yourself down, and allow that bottom piece of your rib to spare you the time from putting lotion on your face in the morning—that fat in that piece of the spare rib is gonna moisturize your skin something wonderful!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Standing out here on this limb again – don’t y’all let me fall!!! I am also making the assumption that the slabs of spare ribs, and your split chickens were seasoned with your dry rub yesterday; your steaks were trimmed, put in zipper plastic bags (excess air squished out please) with your marinade, and all are getting happy in your refrigerator anticipating their warm sauna treatment on your grill of the next day to come! (Note: I have the perfect recipe for a dry rub for your grillin’.  See it in volume one of the series: “Ham Bones: Memoirs of a Southern Cook”)

Next step – pop open your second beer and let’s continue to talk. ( I’m having a Bourbon on the rocks with a twist of lemon if you don’t mind!) We need to chat about that almighty grill fire you seeing flaming up over there. Let it burn, burn, burn ‘til it can’t burn no more! Now, you’ve got a wonderful bed of coals waiting for that meat! Okay y’all, show time!

1. Lift your grill plates and sit your pan of seasoned water directly on the coals; this will be the source for your internal steam.

2. Put your meat on the grill, give it all an initial spray of your seasoned water and CLOSE the LID of your grill. Open your air vent only enough to release the smoke slowly, but NOT enough to fan your coals into a flame!

3. After 30 minutes, open the lid and make sure there is no flame. If so, spray a little of the plain water directly onto the flame—but, do NOT extinguish the coals. Flip your meat over, do a second seasoned spray and close the lid again.

4. After 30 minutes, open the lid and make sure there is no flame. Okay, close the lid back down!

Final step before presentation and eating – saucing!  (Not every grill master sauces! Years ago my cousin Kenny mentioned to me that he serves dry ribs because his spicing is so good and his ribs are so moist! He’s my cousin and I love ‘im, but that’s a carry over from his Tennessee days during his career. I gotta remind him he’s back home in Carolina—WE SAUCE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)

Oh, how this is a conversation that’s always a debate! Well grill masters and grill queens, we will have NO debate! To sauce in the bar-be-que process is to glaze the meat – period, end of conversation! Sauce is NOT meant to cook nor help cook the meat. The sauce is already cooked! This is one of those major steps that separate the grill master and grill queen from the backyard cooker about to mess up some good meat! (How many times have you been invited over for bar-be-que only to see meat that is jet black charred from sugar in the sauce being burned during the cooking process? That’s because the cooker didn’t know that sauce is for glazing!!!!!)

So, now that the meat is done and the coals are just about completely burned out, the “oven” of the grill is still nice and warm – but, NOT cooking-temperature hot—you will now glaze your meat gently, but sufficiently. Put the meat back on the grill, close down the lid and allow the glaze/sauce to adhere to the meat.  This should take about 10 – 15 minutes. Now, remove the meat to your cutting board and allow the meat to rest so that you don’t lose your juices. Resting should be sufficient after about fifteen (15) minutes. It is now time to cut your ribs, cut your chicken, and put it on your meat trays for your guests to admire and praise you for your grilling skills!

As my Daddy use to tell me ever since he started teaching me to bar-be-que when I was fourteen years old: “Son, not everybody who brag can really be called a grillmaster; but now, YOU CAN!!!”

And, now — to all you grill masters and grill queens —

All best wishes for good eating; enjoy!

Joe

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The Best Roast Beef | Ham Bones Cooking Techniques

HamBonesCookingTechniques

The Best Roast Beef

You would be hard-pressed to find someone who loves roast beef more than me—though, I find myself eating a whole lot of chicken, and fish, and beef, and beef and beef!!!!!

Let’s have one of our little chats – grab a cup of coffee and let’s klatch if you will — just some thoughts back and forth on how to come up with the best roast beef in the kitchen!

Emma T and Isaiah always felt that if you’re doing a roasted piece of beef because company is coming over; or it’s the holidays and the family is gathering, then nothing but the best cut – a rib roast was the order of the day!  This calls for a lot of pennies at your local butcher!!! But the joy, of course, is the elation in the eating!

Bunch and Papa Joe felt that since they cook low and slow, the best roast been was a pot roast done with all the glorified accoutrements of potatoes, onions, carrots and celery.  And, if company was coming over, they’d splurge a little bit and add some beautiful mushrooms and a bit of the red wine in the bottle that was stoppered from last night’s dinner!

Growing up, I had the pleasure of enjoying all those versions of roast beef.  During my corporate executive days, when entertaining and presenting roast beef to my guest, if they were superiors I was trying to impress with my culinary prowess, it was Emma T and Isaiah’s presentation all the way:  Roasted Prime Rib of Beef, standing with bones up, French style with little white caps; and au jus laced with a hint of burgundy and finest of minced onion and garlic!  I’d bring it out on a silver meat tray, pat myself on the back and say ‘you go boy, you did it!!!’

When I would want to cook on a weekend, and have some leftovers for dinners during the week, I fondly remembered those wonderful days of my childhood, when on Tuesday my Mom would bring out the pot roast left over from Sunday’s dinner!  Nothing to do but take up a plate – a one-stop task — veggies and gravy included – just add bread! (Note:  Oh how I loved stopping in the deli and picking up a hard roll or a small baguette on the way home from a full day!)

Enter the period of my learning beef a bit better – cooking with the tenderness and flavor of a rib roast; with the economics of a chuck roast – welcome sirloin; welcome brisket!!!  But, careful mind you – I DO prepare them differently!

With a sirloin roast I will do one of two things – cut it up into large chunks and braise it with a lacing of an orange liqueur.  Le Bouef Cointreau is a recipe that I developed based upon my mother’s pot roast methodology.  (In volume one of the series “Ham Bones: Memoirs of a Southern Cook”, I include my mother’s pot roast as well as this wonderful liqueur-enhanced braised sirloin dish!)

Living in New York City, I had many a brisket sandwiches at the famous delicatessens with which we are all familiar.  Those brisket sandwiches were the juiciest, most tender and flavorful beef anyone could ever hope for! In fact, I don’t remember ever having brisket until I moved to New York City!  It wasn’t a very popular cut of beef that I remember while growing up in South Carolina.  I think those briskets sliced at the NYC delicatessens were slow-steamed/boiled until done!  Not having been introduced to brisket before then, I had no idea what part of the carcass from which the brisket came; and I had no idea if there was any other way to prepare it!

Ahhhh, but with travel comes a facet of sophistication – learning different ways of cooking by region!  Texans have a way of slow-smoking their brisket with a tremendous crust on it that they call a bark! Oh my, I had never considered bar-be-queuing beef before moving to Texas!  That brisket they make down there is so flavorful; so juicy; so wonderfully tender, it will make you wonder how is it that everybody does not prepare their brisket the exact same way!  Forget pastrami; forget corned beef; just give me some TX-style brisket!!! (Caveat:  No, no – wait just a minute – don’t throw out the pastrami and corned beef – that’s another chat on another day!!!)

Now, boys and girls forget New York; forget Texas – look at what I did!  Yeah, you guessed it – brisket prepared like I was a South Carolina boy with a new best friend for real – my roasted brisket of beef!!! Cowboys and cowgirls, hold onto you saddle, ‘cause this ride gonna be a Carolina Rodeo!

First, let’s think economics!  Let’s be thrifty!  Buy the WHOLE brisket!  (Oh stop ya’ crying, the $70 you spend will be a cheaper per serving cost in the end!!!) Now, when ya’ get home, cut it in half. Wrap one half and put it in the freezer; you’ll have love and joy for another day in another way!  (Maybe Texas-style next time out!!!)

Now that you’ve got that half still out on the counter, get yourself to the pantry and pull some all-purpose flour; and some spices!  Let’s not get too loose with the spices—specifically we want salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder, and dry mustard powder!  THAT’s IT – you don’t need nothing else – TRUST ME!!! Okay, here we go – riders UP on your saddles!!!

In a medium-size bowl, put in 1 full cup of all-purpose flour; 1 tablespoon each of salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder and dry mustard.  (Note:  I don’t go cheap on this – I love the imported dry mustard in the yellow can!  You know the one – its rich and will do your brisket proud!!! Splurge — buy it!!!)  Use a miniature hand-held whisk and blend that flour-spice mixture.  Now for the good part – totally dust and rub ALL of that mixture on your brisket.  Follow this technique:  Use only about one-quarter on the bottom of the brisket.  Use three-fourths of it on the top-side of the brisket where you have that wonderful adipose tissue that we call fat.  You know, that layer-of-flavor that’s gonna have our palates singing a song upon taste of the final product!  Yes, pour that three-fourths on there, pat in down good that you almost got a bit of a dry paste on top your brisket!  (Ohhhhhh, don’t you worry about how it looks – just wait until you taste it!!!)  Now, that you’ve prepared your brisket, let it be – just leave it on a rack; sit the rack in a rectangular roasting pan; pour in 2 cups of water; cover the whole thing with heavy-duty aluminum foil and leave it on the counter to rest for about 3 minutes!

Cowboys, cowgirls turn and wave your hats to the crowd! Now, turn around and light your ovens – 500 degrees please! Once your ovens reach temperature, Uncover your roast; put in the oven and let it get its game on for about 15 minutes!  Now, open your oven door, slide your roast out – cover it again with that heavy-duty foil; TURN YOUR OVEN DOWN to 225 degrees!  Slide your roast back into the oven and leave it alone; no peaking; no basting; just leave it alone for 3 hours!

Three hours later, add one more cup of water to the pan!  You should see a light gravy in the pan.  Add some finely minced onion and garlic; ½ cup of red wine if you’d like; put back in the oven for another 30 minutes!

Oh you grand chef you – your roast is ready to come out and make you a superstar!  But, before taking its bow, let it rest on the counter – it’s had a hot time in closed spaces!!!  Thirty minutes rest should be sufficient!

Turn ya’ bandana to the left; put your roast on a cutting board; get out your sharp slicing knife and make your incision!  Pour half your gravy onto the meat platter; add your slices of roasted brisket.  Pour the remainder of your gravy in a sauce boat for table presentation!

As your audience give praise and applaud you, enjoy the stardom! (Oh, I’m modest — you can thank me later!!!!!)

Joe2

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Dressing – versus – Stuffing!!!

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Dressing – versus – Stuffing!!!

Don’t  mean to start another Civil War – that ended in 1865; let’s leave it there!!!  But, let’s do have a little fun talking about food differences above and below the Mason-Dixon line!!!  But, remember, we’re just having some fun!

Okay, so now you want to know what’s so funny?!  Let’s say we are about to have a conversation a bit early in the year, about six to seven months early!  It’s April, and we’re going to talk about Thanksgiving Dinner!  This brings me back to my days living in New York City in the 1970s, and talking food with my northern friends that are affectionately known as “Yankees”!  They love a “bready” accompaniment with their turkey the same as we do down south.  But, we have different names for that “twice-baked bread”!

Years ago, while living in New York City some friends invited me over for Thanksgiving Dinner. On the menu was pecan-cranberry dressing!  It was absolutely delicious! ‘Twas a wonderful cornucopia of diced celery and onions, chopped pecans, chopped “craisins” (i.e., dried cranberries), delicious stock, shredded carrots and all sorts of proper Thanksgiving spices (i.e., sage, thyme, celery seed, onion powder, garlic powder, turmeric, salt, pepper, etc.).  BUT, it was not dressing – it was stuffing!

Now, hear me out—don’t chop my head off yet!  I call it stuffing, because down south if it’s made with loaf-bread, it’s stuffing!  If it’s made with cornbread, its dressing!  Again, as I said earlier, the pecan-cranberry dish was wonderful; absolutely delicious.  However, it was made with white bread, cut up into small cubes, dried in the oven before using to mix the dish. Down south – that’s stuffing; whether you stuff the bird or not stuff the bird–doesn’t matter–it’s stuffing!!!

Also, there were NO eggs in the mixture!  As Aunt Emma T and Bunch would have told me  — “boy, you gotta put some eggs in there to bind your dressing!!!” (Note:  Oh, you should read the story of these two fantastic cooks in the first volume in the series:  “Ham Bones: Memoirs of a Southern Cook”.)  No self-respecting southern cook is going to make dressing and not have eggs in it!  It holds it all together in a delicious sort of way!

So, what’s dressing and how do you make it?  It could have been everything that the pecan-cranberry stuffing was, with one substitution and one addition!  Don’t use the dried and cubed loaf bread, instead use some dried cornbread!  Add to the mixture a couple of eggs!  Don’t stuff it in the bird, (a little something I almost never do because of health precautions); instead, bake it separately in a buttered rectangular dish!

Whether you’re making stuffing or dressing, the key is moisture!  No one likes a dry stuffing; no one likes a dry dressing! Here is how you remedy that little malady of cooking—plenty of stock!  Once I finish mixing my dressing “batter” which is rather thick, I make sure that I have enough stock in it that is looks like a wet cornbread!  In the casserole dish (i.e., the rectangular pan), I want to see a bit of that moisture just above the batter – little tiny pools of stock being visible!  Ahhh, then I know for sure that my dressing will not only be delicious—it will also be moist because I have enough stock in it!  Also, stuffing and dressing are two of those “the hands and eyes perfect the recipe” type of dishes! Initially, you do the basic measuring, then it’s feel and eyesight the rest of the way!

Let’s chat a little bit about geography!  My thoughts on the dressing versus the stuffing thing is that it probably came about with a lot of baking of loaf bread in the north; lots of leftovers; and a use for catching turkey drippings inside the bird!  Personally, I don’t like my stuffing having been cooked inside the bird—I prefer it to have been baked in a separate pan.  Food experts also tell me that it safer to cook it separately as well.

Actually, growing up in South Carolina, I never saw a turkey that was stuffed.  All the dressing was baked separately from the bird.  When I ventured north, my relatives from the south that migrated to the north, though a nice divide of some of them preferring the stuffing they discovered once they migrated, also cooked such stuffing separated—thus NOT a stuffing—as nothing was stuffed!!!

So, to all my very dear friends north of my southern divide, we will not have another Civil War, though we may have a civil war as to preference of which dish.  But, for the most part, we will instead enjoy the wonderful variations of stuffing that I discovered in New York City; and this delicious cornbread dressing that we make as tradition down here in Dixie.  My family has a couple dressings that we make.  I start with the historical cornbread from my Daddy’s side of the family.  The Finch Sisters did wonders with cornmeal and you can read all about them, their cornbread, and their dressing.  See their recipes in volume one in the series:  “Ham Bones: Memoirs of a Southern Cook”!)

Okay, everybody put down your arms – grab a plate and fork! Turkey and dressing and stuffing and giblet gravy on the menu!

All best wishes for good eating; enjoy!

Joe

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